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Craig Bryan's picture

How can I support a service member or veteran with PTSD?

Craig J. Bryan, PsyD, ABPP
Executive Director, National Center for Veterans Studies Assistant Professor, The University of Utah
Robert Dingman's picture

How can veterans help other veterans transition back into society?

Robert Dingman, Ed.D.
Director of Military and Veteran Psychology and Train Vets to Treat Vets
Robert Dingman's picture

How can military families cope with the deployment of loved ones?

Robert Dingman, Ed.D.
Director of Military and Veteran Psychology and Train Vets to Treat Vets
Craig Bryan's picture

How can I support a service member or veteran at risk for suicide?

Craig J. Bryan, PsyD, ABPP
Executive Director, National Center for Veterans Studies Assistant Professor, The University of Utah
Dan Sheehan's picture

Finding happiness for you and your family after active duty

Dan Sheehan
Award Winning Author, Marine Aviator, Stay At Home Dad
Christy Flynn's picture

Help kids cope with military life via coping skills and resiliency

Christy Flynn
Outreach Specialist--Children and Youth
Dan Sheehan's picture

Help facilitate your family member's full return home from combat

Dan Sheehan
Award Winning Author, Marine Aviator, Stay At Home Dad
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Military Families

Combat deployments expose troops to extreme physical and psychological stressors, while family members cope with their own deployment-related experiences. These military families face intense challenges and numerous stressors, including separation, the safety concerns for a deployed loved one and the well-being of those left behind. And when service members return from deployment, the challenges continue. It is not uncommon for family members to encounter mixed feelings of joy, anxiety, eagerness, reluctance and relief. Our experts--social workers, psychologists, military experts and doctors--can help you manage these feelings, as well as gain assistance from the community, extended family, friends and neighbors, which can have a lasting effect on service members and their loved ones.

How can I support a service member or veteran with PTSD?

Craig J. Bryan, PsyD, ABPP Executive Director, National Center for Veterans Studies Assistant Professor, The University of Utah National Center for Veterans Studies

Rates of posttraumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, have increased among military personnel and veterans over the past decade. Although PTSD can be a chronic and persistent health condition that affects an individual’s physical health, well-being, and social relationships, scientific advances have led to significant improvements in treatment options. Military personnel and veterans who receive the right treatment at the right time can fairly quickly recover from PTSD and live a high quality life.

Craig J. Bryan, PsyD, ABPPExecutive Director, National Center for Veterans Studies Assistant Professor, The University of Utah

Dr. Craig J. Bryan, PsyD, ABPP, is a board-certified clinical psychologist in cognitive behavioral psychology, and is currently the Executive Director of the National Center for Veterans Studies at The University of Utah. Dr. Bryan received his ...

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How can military families cope with the deployment of loved ones?

Robert Dingman, Ed.D. Director of Military and Veteran Psychology and Train Vets to Treat Vets The Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology (Becoming William James College)

When we hear the word “deployment,” we think of the military servicemen and servicewomen bravely fighting overseas. We imagine their struggles and hardships as they face situations that test them physically and mentally.

But what about their family members at home? As the service members endure trauma on the battlefield, family members struggle with their own challenges on the homefront. Adults must take on extra responsibilities left behind by the missing family member, while children must learn to cope with one parent at home.

Robert Dingman, Ed.D.Director of Military and Veteran Psychology and Train Vets to Treat Vets

Dr. Dingman is a licensed psychologist whose principal clinical interests are in contemporary child and family therapies applied to problems of trauma and attachment. He has worked in community mental health settings in both outpatient and inpat...

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Finding happiness for you and your family after active duty

Dan Sheehan Award Winning Author, Marine Aviator, Stay At Home Dad

For all of the challenges that veterans face, transitioning out of the service is among the hardest. Wrongly viewed as a simple economic transition from one occupation to another, leaving military service can profoundly impact a veteran’s physical, emotional and spiritual well-being.

Incorporating these considerations into decisions made when leaving the military sets the stage for veterans and their families to enjoy the happiness and fulfillment they so richly deserve.

Dan SheehanAward Winning Author, Marine Aviator, Stay At Home Dad

Dan Sheehan served twelve years in the Marine Corps. He flew helicopter gunships during the initial invasion of Iraq in 2003 and returned for a second tour with Marine Corps Special Operations Command, Detachment One in 2004. His personal dec...

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Help facilitate your family member's full return home from combat

Dan Sheehan Award Winning Author, Marine Aviator, Stay At Home Dad

Coming home from combat is a challenge few veterans anticipate. Yet it can be just as deadly as anything on the battlefield. Veterans can take years to readjust to life after combat and tragically, some never do. Their pain and suffering affects not only them--but their entire family as well.

Dan SheehanAward Winning Author, Marine Aviator, Stay At Home Dad

Dan Sheehan served twelve years in the Marine Corps. He flew helicopter gunships during the initial invasion of Iraq in 2003 and returned for a second tour with Marine Corps Special Operations Command, Detachment One in 2004. His personal dec...

View Full ProfileRecent Articles

How can veterans help other veterans transition back into society?

Robert Dingman, Ed.D. Director of Military and Veteran Psychology and Train Vets to Treat Vets The Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology (Becoming William James College)

Veterans are members of a specific subcultural group. Like other groups, veterans report greater comfort speaking with others whom they see as similar to themselves. This is especially true when veterans have difficult memories or feelings to share about their experience as warriors. At such times, they are often emphatic in their desire to speak only with other veterans.

Robert Dingman, Ed.D.Director of Military and Veteran Psychology and Train Vets to Treat Vets

Dr. Dingman is a licensed psychologist whose principal clinical interests are in contemporary child and family therapies applied to problems of trauma and attachment. He has worked in community mental health settings in both outpatient and inpat...

View Full ProfileRecent Articles

How can I support a service member or veteran at risk for suicide?

Craig J. Bryan, PsyD, ABPP Executive Director, National Center for Veterans Studies Assistant Professor, The University of Utah National Center for Veterans Studies

Over the past decade, increased attention has focused on the mental health needs of military personnel and veterans, to include rising rates of suicide. The greatest amount of burden for supporting military personnel and veterans in need falls on those who are closest to the veteran. But little guidance exists for family members and friends of suicidal veterans. What can a family member or friend do support a veteran in need? Fortunately, there are a number of very simple strategies that family members and friends can use to help a suicidal service member or veteran.

Craig J. Bryan, PsyD, ABPPExecutive Director, National Center for Veterans Studies Assistant Professor, The University of Utah

Dr. Craig J. Bryan, PsyD, ABPP, is a board-certified clinical psychologist in cognitive behavioral psychology, and is currently the Executive Director of the National Center for Veterans Studies at The University of Utah. Dr. Bryan received his ...

View Full ProfileRecent Articles

Help kids cope with military life via coping skills and resiliency

Christy Flynn Outreach Specialist--Children and Youth Military Family Research Institute at Purdue University

Our country has been at war for an unprecedented 10-plus years. More than 2 million children have been affected by a loved one’s military service, with many of these children experiencing multiple deployment cycles. While the draw-down of military forces continues, the effects of these wars will be felt for many generations. Even children who were not yet born during their parent’s service ultimately will be affected by it.

Christy FlynnOutreach Specialist--Children and Youth

Christy Flynn is the Outreach Specialist for Children and Youth at the Military Family Research Institute at Purdue University. In her role at MFRI she develops and coordinates military child and youth programming which includes the Passport Tow...

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