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Frank Healy's picture

Grieving dads: Learn how to cope after losing a child

Frank Healy
Licensed Professional Counselor, Highly Superior Autobiographical Memory
Heather Gillis's picture

Manage the pain of grief in your own way after losing a child

Heather Gillis
Author of “Waiting for Heaven”
Paige Toller's picture

Learn how to live after loss and cope with the death of a child

Paige W. Toller, Ph.D.
Associate Professor-School of Communication
Sherrie Campbell's picture

Healing after the loss of your child: Expert advice for parents

Sherrie Campbell, Ph.D.
Steps Through Grieving the Loss of Your child
Nichole Schwerman-Stangel's picture

How can parents manage their grief after the death of a child?

Nichole Schwerman-Stangel
Bereavement Coordinator/CISM Coordinator
Elizabeth Berrien's picture

Creatively coping with the loss of a baby is essential for healing

Elizabeth Berrien
Author of Creative Grieving: A Hip Chick’s Path from Loss to Hope Co-founder of The Respite: A Centre for Grief & Hope
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Loss of a Child

When a child dies, parents feel as if a part of them has also died. Their loss is deeply painful, overwhelming and disorienting. The trauma from losing a child creates a large void in the family what will remain forever.Bereaved parents must find ways to continue to love and honor the life of their deceased child, while also trying to continue to live their own lives. There are no rules, timetables of protocols for mourning the loss of a child. Parents need to cope in their own, personal way, and in their own time. Our experts offer support and guidance as parents navigate the healing journey and work through a complexity of emotions, deep grief and extreme sadness.

Grieving dads: Learn how to cope after losing a child

Frank Healy Licensed Professional Counselor, Highly Superior Autobiographical Memory Associates For Life Enhancement

Losing a child is hard for anyone. Whether your child died of an illness, an accident, or was a stillbirth you need to mourn, though often difficult it is important to learn how to deal with your feelings and continue your life. It is harder to lose a child than an adult relative or loved one because you wonder what they would have become and you get angry that they did not get a chance to live long. Follow this advice to help show you the healthiest ways to cope and the pitfalls to avoid.

Frank HealyLicensed Professional Counselor, Highly Superior Autobiographical Memory

Frank Healy is a Licensed Professional Counselor in the State of New Jersey. He counsels people with depression and anxiety. He has Highly Superior Autobiographical Memory. He remembers every day of his life since he was six years old. This incl...

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Manage the pain of grief in your own way after losing a child

Dealing and coping with loss can be one of the most devastating experiences a person will go through--especially the loss of a child. There are many emotions a parent will experience all at once that can seem overwhelming, incapacitating and even paralyzing.

Even though grief may not physically show a parent’s wounds from loss, the wounds from grief run deep and will take time to heal. Parents will manage grief in their own way, in their own time and at their own pace. It is vital for a parent to recognize that this process is a process that will take time.

Heather GillisAuthor of “Waiting for Heaven”

Heather Gillis works part-time as a certified registered nurse anesthetist (CRNA), and is founder of Bowen’s Hope a ministry to help kidney kids and their families. She is author of “Waiting for Heaven: Finding Beauty in the Pain and the Strug...

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Healing after the loss of your child: Expert advice for parents

Our children are not supposed to die. As parents, we expect to see our children grow into adults and have full lives. We never expect to leave our children behind. When we lose a child, we lose our future, our hopes, our dreams and our identity as a parent. It is profoundly disorienting to lose a child because it is a death that is not supposed to happen. Parents expect to outlive their children--and they never expect to bury them.

Sherrie Campbell, Ph.D. Steps Through Grieving the Loss of Your child

I am a licensed clinical psychologist, author of Loving Yourself: The Mastery of Being Your Own Person, blogger for the Huffington Post, and expert for 20 different online magazines, with radio and TV appearances. I have over 19 years of clini...

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Creatively coping with the loss of a baby is essential for healing

Elizabeth Berrien Author of Creative Grieving: A Hip Chick’s Path from Loss to Hope Co-founder of The Respite: A Centre for Grief & Hope Elizabeth Berrien

Losing a baby is one of the most devastating losses that a person can experience. It goes against the natural order of life and death. A parent should never have to bury their child, but sadly, it is something that happens more often than many people realize.

Elizabeth BerrienAuthor of Creative Grieving: A Hip Chick’s Path from Loss to Hope Co-founder of The Respite: A Centre for Grief & Hope

Elizabeth Berrien is the co-founder of the non-profit The Respite: A Centre for Grief & Hope (www.TheRespite.org) and also the founder of the organization Soul Widows (www.SoulWidows.org) for widows age 60 and under. Her journey began in 2008 w...

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Parents can adjust and discover life after the death of a child

How can parents discover joy and meaning again after our children die? How do we learn to manage the pain of unfathomable loss? It starts with simple intent and then availing yourself of the necessary support and resources. If parents can commit to this course of action, they will learn to adjust to life without the physical presence of their children.

Dave RobertsLMSW,CASAC

I became a parent who experienced the death of a child, after my daughter Jeannine died of cancer on 3/1/03 at the age of 18. I am a retired addiction professional and currently an adjunct professor in the psychology department at Utica College,...

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Learn how to live after loss and cope with the death of a child

As a parent, most people assume that their children will outlive them. Burying one’s child goes against the natural cycle of life. Unfortunately, many parents do experience the heartbreak of having a child die. The grief that accompanies a child’s death is profoundly painful, raw and life-altering. The despair and devastation of grieving a child’s death can result in hopelessness and a lack of meaning. However, with time and support, many bereaved parents learn to live again and even find joy and purpose in life.

Paige W. Toller, Ph.D.Associate Professor-School of Communication

Dr. Toller has been researching communication and parental bereavement for over 15 years. She has published several academic articles examining how communication is impacted after the death of a child....

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How can parents manage their grief after the death of a child?

Having a child die turns your life upside down. Trying to understand your grief may be overwhelming. Grief takes longer than most people think and requires more energy than you ever would have imagined. Although the grief process can be painful, lonely and frightening, allowing yourself to experience your grief is necessary to heal. There is no way around grief—only through it. While everyone grieves differently, these are some suggestions that you may find helpful as you travel through your grief journey.

Nichole Schwerman-StangelBereavement Coordinator/CISM Coordinator

Nichole Schwerman-Stangel, MA, CT, is the Bereavement Coordinator/CISM Coordinator at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin and previously served as the Grief Services Coordinator at MargaretAnn’s Place, a center for grieving children and their famil...

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