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Rafael Torres's picture

Help your loved one with heart attack symptoms when EMS is on its way

Rafael E. Torres, MD
Director, Department of Emergency Medicine
John M. Kennedy's picture

What you do during a heart attack could save your life

John M. Kennedy, M.D.FACC
Director of Preventive Cardiology and Wellness
Erol Veznedaroglu's picture

What to do if you think you are having a stroke

Dr. Erol Veznedaroglu, MD, FACS, FAANS, FAHA
Director, Capital Institute for Neurosciences Chair, Department of Neurosurgery, Capital Health
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Heart Attacks and Strokes

Getting the first aid care for your heart is imperative, especially if it is a medical emergency that could be potentially life threatening like a heart attack, stroke, too high of blood pressure, and even unexplained chest pain. Get the medical advice you need from our team of cardiologists, physicians, and other medical professionals just in case you or your loved ones need help when wondering how to get the treatment and care they need to get healthy and stay that way.

Help your loved one with heart attack symptoms when EMS is on its way

The first and most important thing to do is to call 911 if you think a spouse or close friend may be having a heart attack. The quicker the EMS technicians arrive and begin treatment, the better the prognosis. Sometimes people hesitate to call 911 because they are not sure it’s really a heart attack. But 85% of the damage to the heart muscle occurs within the first 60 minutes after a heart attack. So even if your loved one tells you to wait, make the call—fast!

Watch for the signs of a possible heart attack:

Rafael E. Torres, MDDirector, Department of Emergency Medicine

Board-certified in Emergency Medicine, Dr. Torres completed his undergraduate work at Johns Hopkins University and received his Medical Degree from the George Washington University School of Medicine, where he received honors for academic achiev...

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What to do if you think you are having a stroke

In stroke, time is brain. Seeking prompt emergency care at the first sign of stroke is more important than ever because new interventions can open clots and restore blood flow to the brain, often reducing or preventing permanent brain damage. Several new mechanical blood clot retrieval devices are making emergency interventions highly effective. Not long ago there was not much medicine could do if you had a stroke. That’s no longer the case. So it’s crucial that people act quickly and not dismiss symptoms.

Dr. Erol Veznedaroglu, MD, FACS, FAANS, FAHADirector, Capital Institute for Neurosciences Chair, Department of Neurosurgery, Capital Health

Dr. Erol Veznedaroglu, also known as Dr. Vez, is director of the Capital Institute for Neurosciences. He is also chairman of the Department of Neurosurgery at Capital Health. Responsible for the Capital Institute for Neurosciences and the rapid ...

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What you do during a heart attack could save your life

Heart disease remains the number one killer of men and women in the U.S., claiming nearly one million lives each year. In fact, each day approximately 2,000 people in the United States suffer a heart attack. That’s more than 700,000 over the course of 2014. Interestingly, many people experience a heart attack after having no prior symptoms. These grim facts show just how important it is for people to recognize the seriousness of heart attacks. Heart attacks don’t discriminate and can happen anytime, anyplace and to anyone.

John M. Kennedy, M.D.FACCDirector of Preventive Cardiology and Wellness

Dr. John M. Kennedy is a recognized expert in the field of invasive cardiology and a sought after authority on complementary medical approaches. He has successfully helped thousands of patients with his pioneering to preventive cardiology since ...

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Know what to do if you or someone you know is having a heart attack

The American Heart Association estimates 1.5 million Americans have heart attacks every year. Almost half are suffering their first heart attack, usually with no warning. People's most common heart attack symptom is chest pain or discomfort. Women are more likely than men to experience shortness of breath, nausea/vomiting and back or jaw pain. What should you do if you think you or someone you are with is having a heart attack? Here is some first aid advice.

Tim Issac, MDCardiologist

Dr. Issac received his medical degree from Creighton University School of Medicine in Omaha, Nebraska. He completed his internal medicine residency at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. He then completed his cardiology fellowship at t...

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