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Bonnie Friedman's picture

What to do before you leave the hospital

Bonnie Friedman
Professional Communicator
Harry Kerasidis's picture

Keys to protecting athletes from concussions

Harry Kerasidis, M.D.
Founder, Medical Director
Sridhar Yalamanchili's picture

Exercising after a back injury? Tips for avoiding further injury

Sridhar Yalamanchili, PT, MSPT
Director of Rehabilitation
Justin C. Young's picture

First aid for a bloody nose and how to stop it

Justin C. Young, M.D.
Doctor
Scott A. Weiss's picture

How to treat a muscle cramp: First aid advice to help reduce pain

Dr. Scott A. Weiss DPT LATC CSCS FACSM
Licensed Physical Therapist and Board Certified Athletic Trainer
Christopher J. Centeno's picture

Chronic ankle sprains: How to treat and rebuild strength

Dr. Christopher J. Centeno, M.D.
Medical Director
Christopher J. Centeno's picture

What to do when you have a torn rotator cuff

Dr. Christopher J. Centeno, M.D.
Medical Director
Scott A. Weiss's picture

How to most successfully treat a lumbar herniated disc injury

Dr. Scott A. Weiss DPT LATC CSCS FACSM
Licensed Physical Therapist and Board Certified Athletic Trainer
Alan K. Sokoloff's picture

Proper treatment of an ankle injury can prevent long term problems

Dr. Alan K. Sokoloff, D.C., DACBSP
Chiropractor
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Injuries

Getting injured is never fun. But knowing how to treat and prepare for injuries that can and do happen is key in ensuring that you and your loved ones get the proper care you need. Minor injuries like spraining your ankle, getting a bruise or just feeling the neck or back pain of a past injury have different protocol than major injuries like dislocations, muscle tears, broken bones and fractures. So let us help you take some of the stress off by giving you credible advice from real doctors and medical professionals from the moment the injury happens, to getting the treatment and rehabilitation you need to heal up so your feeling your best.

What to do before you leave the hospital

Bonnie Friedman Professional Communicator Bonnie Friedman Strategic Communications, LLC

Hurray! You are leaving the hospital. That’s cause for celebration. You are better, well enough to go home or at least to a nursing or rehab facility to continue your recuperation. But there are important things to know and do to help ensure smooth sailing in your recovery. You don’t want to backslide, and you surely don’t want to face the prospect of readmission to the hospital. Here are some Dos and Dont’s to help guide you.

Bonnie FriedmanProfessional Communicator

Bonnie is a professional communicator specializing in patient advocacy, worker safety and health, and related issues. Prior to starting her own business several years ago, she served as Communications Director of the Occupational Safety and Heal...

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Exercising after a back injury? Tips for avoiding further injury

People experience pain after a spine injury in unique ways. Sometimes its immobilizing at first and then for many it can lessen to barely a twinge. But whether you’re a gym rat, a weekend warrior or somewhere in between, it’s completely natural to worry if exercising after a spine injury could cause further damage and if you should hold off on working out or keep exercising.

Most experts agree that regular exercise is one of the best ways to maintain a healthy back. However after a back injury exercise can be problematic if done improperly.

Sridhar Yalamanchili, PT, MSPTDirector of Rehabilitation

Atlantic Spine Center is a nationally recognized leader for endoscopic spine surgery with three locations in New Jersey in West Orange, Edison and North Bergen. Sridhar Yalamanchili, PT, MSPT, is Director of Rehabilitation at Atlantic Spine ...

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How to treat a muscle cramp: First aid advice to help reduce pain

Nearly everyone experiences a muscle cramp throughout out their lifetime and muscular cramps occur for several reasons. Medications, dehydration, electrolyte imbalances, circulatory and vitamin deficiencies all can cause a muscular cramp. A cramp is a strong, forceful muscular contraction usually predicated by twitching or fasciculation, which is a type of built in warning mechanism. Once a muscle cramps, the muscle fibers stay in a shortened state with the inability to release or relax. The longer the muscle is cramped the less blood flow it receives and the more sore it can get.

Dr. Scott A. Weiss DPT LATC CSCS FACSMLicensed Physical Therapist and Board Certified Athletic Trainer

Dr. Scott Weiss is a licensed physical therapist and board certified athletic trainer in the state of New York. He is also a registered exercise physiologist, strength and conditioning specialist and advanced personal trainer with over twenty ye...

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Chronic ankle sprains: How to treat and rebuild strength

Many people experience chronic ankle sprains. This condition is characterized by a recurring “giving way” of the outer side of the ankle. This type of condition usually develops after repeated ankle sprains and is commonly seen in athletes as well as non-athletes while walking or physical activities. This chronic ankle instability is often a result of an injured ankle that has not adequately healed or was not rehabilitated correctly. The repetitive “giving way” is actually an overstretching of the ligaments which never properly tighten. This leaves the ankle vulnerable and unsupported.

Dr. Christopher J. Centeno, M.D.Medical Director

Christopher J. Centeno, M.D. is an international expert and specialist in regenerative medicine and the clinical use of mesenchymal stem cells in orthopedics. He is board certified in physical medicine as well as rehabilitation and in pain manag...

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How to most successfully treat a lumbar herniated disc injury

Between 60% and 80% of adults will experience low back pain at some point over their lifetime. A high percentage of people will have low back and leg pain caused by a herniated disk pushing on a nerve root. Although a herniated disk can sometimes be very painful, and can cause life to slow down incredibly, most people feel much better with just a few weeks or months of nonsurgical treatment through physical therapy.

Dr. Scott A. Weiss DPT LATC CSCS FACSMLicensed Physical Therapist and Board Certified Athletic Trainer

Dr. Scott Weiss is a licensed physical therapist and board certified athletic trainer in the state of New York. He is also a registered exercise physiologist, strength and conditioning specialist and advanced personal trainer with over twenty ye...

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Treat a hamstring injury with proper rehabilitation and recovery

Hamstring injuries strike athletes of every type, from runners and skaters to football, soccer and basketball players. The hamstring is a group of three muscles that run along the back of the thigh, enabling you to bend your leg at the knee.

When stretched too far the muscles can start to tear, especially when a lot of sudden stopping and starting is involved in the athletic activity. It happens most commonly when:

Dr. Alan K. Sokoloff, D.C., DACBSPChiropractor

Dr. Alan K. Sokoloff, D.C., DACBSP, is team chiropractor for the NFL’s Baltimore Ravens, ScripHessco strategic partner and owner/clinic director of the Yalich Clinic Performance and Rehabilitation in Glen Burnie, Maryland, where he has practiced...

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What to do if you tear your Achilles tendon

It is important to know what to do when you tear your Achilles tendon so you can avoid further injuries and to lay the grounds for optimal healing. Below are some pointers on what to do if you suspect you suffered a tear, and what not to do so the healing process goes unhindered. Achilles tendon injuries are most common in high impact activities. Tendon tears can also be the result of repetitive injury, or from certain medications such as steroids, that weaken the tendon over time. One can suffer a partial tear or a complete rupture of the Achilles.

Kosta Kokolis MSPTPhysical Therapist

Kosta Kokolis is a licensed physical therapist in the state of New York . He has achieved a bachelor’s degree in health science and a master’s degree in physical therapy from New York Institute of Technology. Kosta is currently enrolled in schoo...

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Patient Advocacy: What to do when a loved one is hospitalized

Bonnie Friedman Professional Communicator Bonnie Friedman Strategic Communications, LLC

When someone you love has to go to the hospital, your life changes. Suddenly, old priorities no longer seem important, and pressing, new demands take hold. Your number one job becomes helping your loved one get better. That means you are an advocate, helping to ensure that the patient gets the best medical care possible.

To be an effective advocate, you need to be informed, organized and determined. Here is some advice to help you get started.

Bonnie FriedmanProfessional Communicator

Bonnie is a professional communicator specializing in patient advocacy, worker safety and health, and related issues. Prior to starting her own business several years ago, she served as Communications Director of the Occupational Safety and Heal...

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Choose a physical therapist with the right experience and credentials

Choosing the correct physical therapist for yourself can be quite a daunting task if you do not know what to look for. There are several key points that can aid in your decision making, and this decision shouldn’t be taken lightly. Licensing, credentials, and experience are some of the most important factors, here is some advice to help.

Dr. Scott A. Weiss DPT LATC CSCS FACSMLicensed Physical Therapist and Board Certified Athletic Trainer

Dr. Scott Weiss is a licensed physical therapist and board certified athletic trainer in the state of New York. He is also a registered exercise physiologist, strength and conditioning specialist and advanced personal trainer with over twenty ye...

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Advice for choosing a brain injury rehabilitation program

A brain injury can happen to anyone at any time. Each year, an estimated 1.7 million Americans sustain traumatic brain injuries. Most of these occur during motor vehicle accidents or falls. Countless others suffer acquired brain injuries due to medical conditions such as strokes, tumors, and aneurysms. In addition, many of our returning servicemen and women sustained brain injuries secondary to blast injuries during their tours of duty. Navigating the options for rehabilitation can seem overwhelming.

Cynthia L. Boyer, Ph.DExecutive Director

Dr. Boyer has more than 20 years experience as a clinician and administrator in neuropsychology and brain injury rehabilitation. She has adjunct faculty appointments at Rowan University (Department of Special Education), Widener University (Depa...

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What to do if your child experiences a concussion or blow to the head

Edward Dabrowski, MD Chief of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation on Staff Children’s Hospital of Michigan (part of the Detroit Medical Center)

A concussion is a type of traumatic brain injury (TBI) that is caused by a sudden blow to the head or body. It can lead to a temporary loss of normal brain function. When a person gets a head injury, the brain can move around inside, which can lead to bruising of the brain, and injury of the blood vessels and nerves.

Edward Dabrowski, MDChief of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation on Staff

First aid advice to assess and treat a lower back injury

Acute low back pain accounts for more than 3 percent of all emergency room visits annually in the United States. So what should you do if you tweak your back? Here is some expert advice for the first aid treatment of a lower back injury.

Nathan Wei, MD, FACP, FACRArthritis expert and Consultant

Dr. Nathan Wei is an nationally known arthritis expert and consultant. A graduate of Swarthmore College and the Jefferson Medical College, he completed his residency at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan and his arthritis training...

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Some first aid advice when you dislocate your shoulder

Michael D. Lanigan, MD, FACEP Asst. Professor of Emergency Medicine and Attending Physician Dept. of Emergency Medicine, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY

Many shoulder injuries are not serious and will improve with rest, ice, and over the counter pain medications. However, the shoulder is a ball and socket joint, and is prone to serious injury such as dislocation (shoulder head out of joint) with blunt force from a direct blow such as in contact sports, motor vehicle accidents, seizures, or fractures (breaking of the bones) from a direct blow or a fall. Keep in mind this advice if you have just injured your shoulder.

Michael D. Lanigan, MD, FACEPAsst. Professor of Emergency Medicine and Attending Physician

Medical Director, Urgent Care Center, SUNY Downstate at Bay Ridge Former Medical Director of Emergency Services, Orange Regional Medical Center, Middletown, NY Former Associate Medical Director, Dept. of Emergency Medicine, St. Luke’s-Roosevel...

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Keys to protecting athletes from concussions

Concussions are dangerous, and finally garnering due media attention unfortunately for the wrong reasons. Proper protocols are still a mystery for most youth and high school sports teams. At least five high school athletes died from complications from concussions last year, and who can forget the Ohio State football player who took his own life after complaining of concussions. The real scary news is that most concussions are never reported, despite more than 3 million being recorded every year by the Center for Disease Control.

Harry Kerasidis, M.D.Founder, Medical Director

Harry Kerasidis, M.D. is one of only a few neurologists in the world specializing in the impairment of cognitive and emotional performance resulting from concussions. After 25 years treating hundreds of concussions, Dr. Kerasidis noticed existin...

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First aid for a bloody nose and how to stop it

Bloody noses, clinically known as epistaxis, are an occurrence that most of us have experienced at some point in our lives. The most common causes are direct trauma from injury, and believe it or not, nose-picking. It may also occur from excessive blowing of the nose particularly during colds, illness, or fits of allergies. In other cases, high blood pressure can lead to nosebleeds.

Justin C. Young, M.D.Doctor

Justin C. Young, M.D. is a physician from Atlanta, who now lives in Los Angeles. He is a 2002 graduate of UNC-Chapel Hill and former Student Body President. He graduated from Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tenn., in 2008 and started initi...

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Get a bloody nose almost every day? Here's what to do

Many people know how to manage a bloody nose, which in most cases is a minor nuisance, but if it lasts for an extended period without stopping or happens more frequently on a regular basis, more needs to be done than just pinching the nose. If you repeatedly get a bloody nose, here are a few things to consider.

Justin C. Young, M.D.Doctor

Justin C. Young, M.D. is a physician from Atlanta, who now lives in Los Angeles. He is a 2002 graduate of UNC-Chapel Hill and former Student Body President. He graduated from Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tenn., in 2008 and started initi...

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What to do when you have a torn rotator cuff

As our active population ages an injury we’re seeing more and more is the rotator cuff tear. The rotator cuff, located in the shoulder, is responsible for holding your arm into your shoulder socket. In 2008, close to 2 million people in the United States went to their doctors because of a rotator cuff problem. A torn rotator cuff will weaken your shoulder and make ordinary activities like getting dressed or raising your arms above your head painful and difficult to do.

Dr. Christopher J. Centeno, M.D.Medical Director

Christopher J. Centeno, M.D. is an international expert and specialist in regenerative medicine and the clinical use of mesenchymal stem cells in orthopedics. He is board certified in physical medicine as well as rehabilitation and in pain manag...

View Full ProfileRecent Articles

Proper treatment of an ankle injury can prevent long term problems

Most ankle injuries occur either during sports activities or while running or walking on an uneven surface that forces the foot and ankle into an unnatural position. An ankle injury can happen as a result of:

Dr. Alan K. Sokoloff, D.C., DACBSPChiropractor

Dr. Alan K. Sokoloff, D.C., DACBSP, is team chiropractor for the NFL’s Baltimore Ravens, ScripHessco strategic partner and owner/clinic director of the Yalich Clinic Performance and Rehabilitation in Glen Burnie, Maryland, where he has practiced...

View Full ProfileRecent Articles

Essential advice for ensuring a successful ACL injury rehab

An injury to any part of the body can result in pain and loss of function, but an injury to the ACL (Anterior Cruciate Ligament) of the knee can often lead to abnormality of gait, sensations of instability, constant swelling and the inability to participate in sports and recreation. This article will explain exactly what to focus on and what to be cautious of during the rehab process.

Dr. Scott A. Weiss DPT LATC CSCS FACSMLicensed Physical Therapist and Board Certified Athletic Trainer

Dr. Scott Weiss is a licensed physical therapist and board certified athletic trainer in the state of New York. He is also a registered exercise physiologist, strength and conditioning specialist and advanced personal trainer with over twenty ye...

View Full ProfileRecent Articles

First aid advice if you experience a groin pull or strain

Ensuring that you take proper care of a groin injury right after it happens can help you to reduce pain and prevent further injury. Ice is recommended for the first 24 hours, and then heat should be applied. Also, stop exercising and don’t try to just work through the pain. Here is some advice on how to provide the first aid needed after a groin pull and simple steps in managing it in the future.

Dr. Scott A. Weiss DPT LATC CSCS FACSMLicensed Physical Therapist and Board Certified Athletic Trainer

Dr. Scott Weiss is a licensed physical therapist and board certified athletic trainer in the state of New York. He is also a registered exercise physiologist, strength and conditioning specialist and advanced personal trainer with over twenty ye...

View Full ProfileRecent Articles

Get back on your feet again after a hamstring injury with rehab

James Winger, MD Assistant Professor of Family Medicine Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine

The hamstrings are the muscles of the back of your thigh. They are commonly injured, usually when participating in running sports. They are challenging to rehabilitate, commonly recur and improper or incomplete rehabilitation leads to a higher risk of recurrence. Properly rehabilitating a hamstring injury will not only get you back to sport quicker, but decrease your risk of the hamstring being re-injured.

James Winger, MDAssistant Professor of Family Medicine

Family Medicine and Primary Care Sports Medicine specialist. ...

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How to avoid and recover from a knee injury caused by running

Matt DeBole Doctor of Physical Therapy Candidate University of Pittsburgh

Most runners experience knee pain at some point in their career. Knee injuries are characterized as overuse injuries, meaning they occur gradually over time with subtle symptoms. This can make them challenging to diagnose and may require patience during the recovery process. However, by taking certain precautions and listening to your body, the road to full health can be a smooth one.

Matt DeBoleDoctor of Physical Therapy Candidate

Matt DeBole is a Doctor of Physical Therapy candidate at the University of Pittsburgh. A five-time track and field All-American at Georgetown University, Matt went on to compete in the 2008 Olympic Trials in the 1500 meters qualifying for the se...

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Surgery is not your only option for treating an ACL injury

Hundreds of thousands of people experience ACL tears per year, almost always athletes. However, injuring your ACL can happen to people who aren’t athletes as well.

The ACL is a ligament in the knee, and acts as a primary stabilizer in the knee for rotational movement. When you plant your foot to change direction, your ACL is the main ligament in your knee that allows for movement. Most often, ACL tears happen when playing sports like soccer, basketball, football and tennis - activities that require lots of changing of direction at a fast pace.

Dr. Christopher J. Centeno, M.D.Medical Director

Christopher J. Centeno, M.D. is an international expert and specialist in regenerative medicine and the clinical use of mesenchymal stem cells in orthopedics. He is board certified in physical medicine as well as rehabilitation and in pain manag...

View Full ProfileRecent Articles

First aid advice for the treatment of a pulled muscle

Ever pull a muscle? Want to know what to do if it happens again? Here is some first aid advice to help you if you have experienced a pulled muscle.

Nathan Wei, MD, FACP, FACRArthritis expert and Consultant

Dr. Nathan Wei is an nationally known arthritis expert and consultant. A graduate of Swarthmore College and the Jefferson Medical College, he completed his residency at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan and his arthritis training...

View Full ProfileRecent Articles

Know how to treat a concussion right away to prevent brain damage

Concussions are a very common type of traumatic brain injury that often occur in the realm of sports and recreation. Knowing what to do to administer first aid to someone suspected of having a brain injury can be life saving and can help prevent permanent brain damage. There are many misconceptions regarding concussions and the importance of properly treating even the mildest of brain trauma must not be overlooked.

Andrew M. Blecher MDSports Medicine Physician

For over a decade Dr Blecher has been providing sports medicine care to athletes from little league to the major leagues. He is Board Certified in Sports Medicine and has a particular interest in Concussions in the Athlete. In addition to provid...

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