Lindsey M. Muller's picture

Overcome compulsive nail biting, skin picking, and hair pulling

Lindsey M. Muller
MS, LPCCI, Impulse Control Therapist
Lindsey M. Muller's picture

Understanding body-focused repetitive behaviors in your child

Lindsey M. Muller
MS, LPCCI, Impulse Control Therapist
Andrew R. Gilbert's picture

Help your child who has OCD: Beat back compulsive behavior

Andrew R. Gilbert, M.D.
Medical Director
Jonathan Schwartz's picture

Managing scrupulosity OCD: Know how to live a healthy religious life

Dr. Jonathan Schwartz PsyD
Licensed Clinical Psychologist and Anxiety Specialist
Jonathan Schwartz's picture

Don't freak out when your partner tells you they have OCD

Dr. Jonathan Schwartz PsyD
Licensed Clinical Psychologist and Anxiety Specialist
Melissa Deuter's picture

Teens - Don't be afraid to ask for help with OCD

Melissa Deuter, MD
Psychiatrist
Crystal Clancy's picture

Reach out for support to help manage symptoms of postpartum OCD

Crystal Clancy, MA LMFT
Clinical Director, Co-Director
Julia Samton's picture

Advice for spouses and partners with obsessive compulsive disorder

Julia Samton, MD
Director of Manhattan Neuropsychiatric and Board Certified in Psychiatry & Neurology
Frank Healy's picture

To help you treat OCD, you need to develop mental strength

Frank Healy
Licensed Professional Counselor, Highly Superior Autobiographical Memory
Frank Healy's picture

Advice for helping your teenager overcome OCD

Frank Healy
Licensed Professional Counselor, Highly Superior Autobiographical Memory
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Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is an anxiety disorder that manifests itself when certain rituals or routines aren’t enacted. Many times, people can have upsetting, anxious, and depressive or suicidal thoughts when their compulsion emerges. OCD affects millions of people, and all of them differently, so it is important to get treatment, therapy, and help so that you can learn how to control the urges and reduce the anxiety. Here at ExpertBeacon, our licensed psychologists and mental health professionals are here you help you, your children, and your loved one’s overcome the fear, apprehension, and grief that comes with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Overcome compulsive nail biting, skin picking, and hair pulling

Lindsey M. Muller MS, LPCCI, Impulse Control Therapist L. Muller Therapy & Spectrum CBT

Whether you have started recently, or are a long-time sufferer, the behavior of skin picking, nail biting, or hair pulling is no less emotionally devastating or physically damaging. It can be confusing to sift through feelings and thoughts as you try to make sense of what your behavior means, why you do what you do, and how to make positive changes. Here are dos and don'ts for treatment for these body-focused repetitive behaviors.

Lindsey M. MullerMS, LPCCI, Impulse Control Therapist

Ms. Muller is a Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor Intern (#1687) practicing in Los Angeles. She has attended several universities across the country including Lehigh University, Auburn University, Valdosta State University, The University...

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Help your child who has OCD: Beat back compulsive behavior

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a psychiatric disorder that frequently starts in childhood and adolescence. While often misunderstood, OCD can be challenging to manage, but it is very responsive to treatment. OCD is characterized by anxiety-provoking intrusive thoughts (obsessions) and/or anxiety-reducing repetitive behaviors (compulsions).

Andrew R. Gilbert, M.D.Medical Director

Andrew R. Gilbert, M.D. is a board certified child, adolescent and adult psychiatrist and Medical Director of the Hallowell Center in New York City. Dr. Gilbert practices both psychopharmacology and psychotherapy and each approach is individuall...

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Don't freak out when your partner tells you they have OCD

You think you finally found “The One.” S/he really seems to get you, love you, and you can even begin to imagine spending the rest of your lives together. And then “the conversation” happens. Your significant other tells you that you need “to talk” because s/he thinks it is getting serious and wants to be honest an open. S/he tells you that s/he has been suffering from OCD and wanted you to know. How can you process the news? What is okay to think? To say? To do?

Dr. Jonathan Schwartz PsyDLicensed Clinical Psychologist and Anxiety Specialist

Dr. Jonathan Schwartz, Clinical Director at the Center for Anxiety Relief in Union, NJ has been a mental health provider since 1995. He specializes in working with a wide spectrum of anxiety and mood disorders including: Obsessive Compulsive Dis...

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Reach out for support to help manage symptoms of postpartum OCD

You just had a baby, and life is all sunshine and rainbows, right? Wrong. If you find yourself having a hard time relaxing, checking things repeatedly, getting stuck on thoughts about something bad happening, or feeling the need to clean and wash everything over and over, it could be a sign of postpartum OCD (PPOCD).

Crystal Clancy, MA LMFTClinical Director, Co-Director

Crystal Clancy is a married mother of two. She experienced postpartum depression following the birth of her second child. She helped found Pregnancy and Postpartum Support MN, a non-profit organization that connects new and expectant parents wit...

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To help you treat OCD, you need to develop mental strength

Frank Healy Licensed Professional Counselor, Highly Superior Autobiographical Memory Associates For Life Enhancement

Do you have habits that have become annoying rituals. Do you spend too much time washing, cleaning the house constantly, or checking the kitchen doors and locks over and over? While these activities are good to do, It becomes a problem when you do them over and over, and when the rituals interfere with your life. Here is some advice for what helps you and what doesn’t help you when treating Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) on your own.

Frank HealyLicensed Professional Counselor, Highly Superior Autobiographical Memory

Frank Healy is a Licensed Professional Counselor in the State of New Jersey. He counsels people with depression and anxiety. He has Highly Superior Autobiographical Memory. He remembers every day of his life since he was six years old. This incl...

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Understanding body-focused repetitive behaviors in your child

Lindsey M. Muller MS, LPCCI, Impulse Control Therapist L. Muller Therapy & Spectrum CBT

We all have family but not all of us have family members that are supportive or even know about managing a body-focused repetitive behaviors (BFRBs) such as skin picking or hair pulling (called Trichotillomania). These are diagnosed mental health issues that can be confusing and painful to watch as an outsider. BFRBs affect up to five percent of the population at one point in his or her life but are not readily discussed by the individual who is struggling. How do you deal with family members that just don't get it? "My relatives just found out I pick my skin [bite nails, pull hair].

Lindsey M. MullerMS, LPCCI, Impulse Control Therapist

Ms. Muller is a Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor Intern (#1687) practicing in Los Angeles. She has attended several universities across the country including Lehigh University, Auburn University, Valdosta State University, The University...

View Full ProfileRecent Articles

Managing scrupulosity OCD: Know how to live a healthy religious life

Your friends call you “more devout than God himself”. Yet, when you consider your religious values, you seem more directed out of fear of angering God or receiving His punishment than anything that seems holy. In fact, at times your religious requirements make you so afraid that you will “mess up” that you get so anxiety ridden, you panic and perhaps even try to avoid the religious observance. You may be suffering not from religion, but from scrupulosity OCD. Scrupulosity literally means 'fearing sin where there is none'.

Dr. Jonathan Schwartz PsyDLicensed Clinical Psychologist and Anxiety Specialist

Dr. Jonathan Schwartz, Clinical Director at the Center for Anxiety Relief in Union, NJ has been a mental health provider since 1995. He specializes in working with a wide spectrum of anxiety and mood disorders including: Obsessive Compulsive Dis...

View Full ProfileRecent Articles

Teens - Don't be afraid to ask for help with OCD

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a mental health disorder that is characterized by obsessions, compulsions, or both. Obsessions are unwanted repeating thoughts, mental pictures, or urges that create strong feelings of distress. Obsessive thoughts usually focus on fear, worry, or possible negative outcomes. Examples include repeating thoughts about contracting an illness or non-stop fears of failing in school. Some people with OCD experience obsessive thoughts as “invading their minds,” and then feel as sense of “looping” around and around the same unwanted/unstoppable thoughts.

Melissa Deuter, MDPsychiatrist

Dr. Melissa Deuter is a board certified psychiatrist. She received her undergraduate degree from the University of Arkansas and attended medical school at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. She completed her psychiatry residency at...

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Advice for spouses and partners with obsessive compulsive disorder

Julia Samton, MD Director of Manhattan Neuropsychiatric and Board Certified in Psychiatry & Neurology Manhattan Neuropsychiatric

OCD is a relatively common mental illness, affecting about 1/40 individuals. The characteristic symptoms are the presence of obsessions and compulsions. Obsessions are unpleasant and persistent thoughts, images, and/or urges. Examples include involuntary thoughts about contamination, germs, violent images, and or violent urges. The affected individual attempts to neutralize these thoughts by either suppressing them or performing a behavior or compulsion. Compulsions usually take the form of repetitive behaviors such as hand washing or counting.

Julia Samton, MDDirector of Manhattan Neuropsychiatric and Board Certified in Psychiatry & Neurology

Dr. Julia Samton is Board Certified in Psychiatry and Neurology and is currently the Director of Manhattan Neuropsychiatric, P.C. Dr. Samton is a voluntary faculty member at New York Hospital Weill Cornell and Lenox Hill Hospital in New York Cit...

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Advice for helping your teenager overcome OCD

Frank Healy Licensed Professional Counselor, Highly Superior Autobiographical Memory Associates For Life Enhancement

This article can assist parents with tools to use to help your teenager cope with OCD. It gives you interventions that are helpful, and interventions that are not so helpful. The main thing you should keep in mind is to be patient and seek help from a mental health professional such as a therapist or psychologist. Here is some advice to keep in mind.

Frank HealyLicensed Professional Counselor, Highly Superior Autobiographical Memory

Frank Healy is a Licensed Professional Counselor in the State of New Jersey. He counsels people with depression and anxiety. He has Highly Superior Autobiographical Memory. He remembers every day of his life since he was six years old. This incl...

View Full ProfileRecent Articles