Frank Sileo's picture

Coping with grief and loss during the holidays

Frank J. Sileo, PhD
Licensed Psychologist
Lydia Ramsey's picture

How to respond to a friend when their loved one has passed

Lydia Ramsey
International business etiquette expert, professional speaker and author
Mara Baginski's picture

How to explain death and terminal illness to your loved ones

Mara Baginski, LCSW
Bereavement Counselor
Lacy Robinson's picture

Grieving is normal, but it's vital to do so in a healthy way

Lacy Robinson
Director of Professional Development, Licensed Funeral Director and Embalmer
Beth B. Bucheister's picture

Participating in a grief support group can benefit your well-being

Beth B. Bucheister, MA, CPC
Certified Professional Coach
Frank Healy's picture

Use memories of the person you lost to help you grieve

Frank Healy
Licensed Professional Counselor, Highly Superior Autobiographical Memory
Mark Pitstick's picture

Learn how to cope when a loved one commits suicide

Mark Pitstick, MA, DC
Author, speaker, frequent radio/TV guest, and holistic chiropractic physician
Maria Dancing Heart Hoaglund's picture

Cope with grief in a culture that tends to not honor bereavement

Maria Dancing Heart Hoaglund
Transformational Healer, End of Life Coach and Spiritual Counselor
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Coping with Death and Grief

Unfortunately, death is an inevitable part of life. We all have to deal with the pain of coping after a loved one has passed, and it is never easy. It takes an emotional and physical toll that can have lasting effects on the rest of our lives. Losing a close friend, parent, brother or sister, perhaps when it seems too early in life, brings up unexplainable questions that are sometimes answered through religion or spirituality. But no matter how you personally grieve, the important thing is to seek answers in your own way so as to regain your mental health and move on to live your life, while also remembering the happy times you spent with them. To help you through the grieving process and honor their life after death, our grief counselors, psychologists, and other mental health professionals are here to help.

Coping with grief and loss during the holidays

The holidays can be difficult when you have experienced a loss. The loss can be a person, pet, job, or relationship. Culturally, we have learned that holidays are supposed to be filled with love, happiness, family, friends and get-togethers. When you have experienced a loss of some kind, it can make the holidays very difficult to get through. The feelings of grief can become intensified. You may be filled with memories of times gone by or feelings of hopelessness for the future. There are ways to cope with loss and grief during the holiday season.

Frank J. Sileo, PhDLicensed Psychologist

Dr. Frank J. Sileo is a New Jersey licensed psychologist and is the Founder and Executive Director of The Center for Psychological Enhancement, LLC located in Ridgewood, New Jersey. He received his Doctorate in psychology from Fordham University...

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Heal from grief of losing a loved one with past life regression

Too often, those of us who are grieving the loss of a loved one can only see endings. We see finality to the time we can share, termination of our relationship with those passing, and feel a sense of permanent loss. Counselors recommend remembering the best parts of our experiences with those we have lost and keeping their memories alive. Friends tell us to focus on the ways our lives have been improved by knowing the person we have lost. Despite this, the separation can still be very painful.

Mira KelleyPast Life Regressionist

Mira Kelley is a world-renowned expert on past life regression and the best-selling author of Beyond Past Lives. She facilitates workshops, retreats, individual consultations and speaks around the world, promoting the healing and enlightening be...

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How to explain death and terminal illness to your loved ones

When we find out someone we love is dying we are filled with many emotions. One emotion we may feel is fear or worry. We may think how will our life look without this person in it or how in the world do you explain this to your family and friends? Before explaining the terminal illness or death to a loved one, it is important to first remember who your audience is. Once you have established who you will be explaining this news to, then you can better prepare yourself for what to expect.

Mara Baginski, LCSWBereavement Counselor

Mara Krotec Baginski conducts individual and group bereavement support sessions for children and adults whose loved ones were under Family Hospice care. Ms. Baginski also facilitates anticipatory grief support to children and families. She is ac...

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Participating in a grief support group can benefit your well-being

We are forever changed by the experience of loss and no two people experience the sorrow of loss in the same way. Individuals often feel alone in grief. Isolation can feel protective, but it can also prevent the opportunity to grow through grief. Group work is one way that grief is transformed into possibility. It is important to know that we have an opportunity to continue to love those we’ve lost and to learn to love ourselves more in the process of grief. Participation in groups helps this process.

Beth B. Bucheister, MA, CPCCertified Professional Coach

I am a certified professional life coach with a focus on helping people grow through grief and allowing the experience of loss to shape one's future without defining it. I help my clients have improved self-esteem, become more independent and op...

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Learn how to cope when a loved one commits suicide

Mark Pitstick, MA, DC Author, speaker, frequent radio/TV guest, and holistic chiropractic physician Radiant Wellness Center LLC

Nearly 40,000 people take their own lives every year in the U.S. The impact of these deaths is much larger, however, since suicides haunt each family member, friend, co-worker and acquaintance of the deceased. Those left behind may wonder if there was something they could have done to prevent it. They may feel guilty or responsible that they didn’t see it coming. Most of all, they worry about the fate of the departed loved one and what will happen to his or her soul/life-force. Their grief may be amplified by the thought that they will never see these loved ones again.

Mark Pitstick, MA, DCAuthor, speaker, frequent radio/TV guest, and holistic chiropractic physician

Mark Pitstick, B.S., M.A., D.C., has over forty years experience and training in hospitals, pastoral counseling settings, mental health centers, and holistic private practice. His training includes a premedical degree, graduate theology/pastoral...

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Learning to manage the pain of grief during the holidays

The pain of grief from any significant loss tends to surface with great intensity during certain milestone events. Holidays present their own unique challenges, particularly for the newly bereaved. There are questions about how to celebrate the holidays after loss. Do I keep the same traditions or develop new ones? Do I tell my friends and family that things have changed; that I am not the same? What if I don’t have the emotional fortitude to deal with the holidays, how do I proceed? How do I best honor the memory of my deceased loved one?

Dave RobertsLMSW,CASAC

I became a parent who experienced the death of a child, after my daughter Jeannine died of cancer on 3/1/03 at the age of 18. I am a retired addiction professional and currently an adjunct professor in the psychology department at Utica College,...

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How to respond to a friend when their loved one has passed

Lydia Ramsey International business etiquette expert, professional speaker and author Manners That Sell

Do you struggle with what to do when a friend loses a loved one? If you do, you are not alone. Most people have no idea what to do or say. They search to find answers and when they can’t find them, they simply do nothing. While death can be an extremely uncomfortable topic, the worst thing you can do is to ignore it or pretend it didn’t happen. Here are some ideas for what to do or say, as well as what not to do or say, to be supportive and caring.

Lydia RamseyInternational business etiquette expert, professional speaker and author

I founded Manners That Sell 15 years ago after working in the healthcare industry, the non-profit community, the retail sector and hospitality world. In all of those arenas as well as in daily life, I recognized the need for people to hone their...

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Grieving is normal, but it's vital to do so in a healthy way

Lacy Robinson Director of Professional Development, Licensed Funeral Director and Embalmer Aurora Casket

Inevitably, each of us will experience loss during our lifetime. We will also find ourselves in the position of supporting a friend or loved one who is experiencing loss. Coping with grief is challenging and complex. No two people cope with grief and loss in the same way, even if they are both mourning the loss of the same person. Grieving is never easy, so it’s important to acknowledge that your feelings are normal and cope with them in a healthy way.

Lacy RobinsonDirector of Professional Development, Licensed Funeral Director and Embalmer

Lacy Robinson is a Kentucky licensed funeral director/embalmer and a certified member of the Academy of Professional Funeral Service Practice. She is a graduate of Georgetown College, Georgetown, Kentucky holding a bachelor’s degree in Communica...

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Use memories of the person you lost to help you grieve

Frank Healy Licensed Professional Counselor, Highly Superior Autobiographical Memory Associates For Life Enhancement

When you lose someone to death, the tendency at first is to focus on how bad it is because you will never see them again. However, you can go through the mourning process more quickly when you go through memorabilia of the person and allow yourself to enjoy reminiscing. Read about this and other tips to handle the loss of a loved one.

Frank HealyLicensed Professional Counselor, Highly Superior Autobiographical Memory

Frank Healy is a Licensed Professional Counselor in the State of New Jersey. He counsels people with depression and anxiety. He has Highly Superior Autobiographical Memory. He remembers every day of his life since he was six years old. This incl...

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Cope with grief in a culture that tends to not honor bereavement

We live in a culture where expressing grief is often not honored in meaningful ways. We live in a society that’s awkward around the subject of grief and death & dying. We have “bereavement leaves” in the workplace that last for two to four days. We use words like you need to “get over it,” and “keep busy,” and maintain a “stiff upper lip.” It’s almost as if we encourage each other to turn a blind eye and ear to our true feelings. So it’s no wonder that we call this grief work.

Maria Dancing Heart HoaglundTransformational Healer, End of Life Coach and Spiritual Counselor

Rev. Maria Dancing Heart Hoaglund is an author, transformational healer, U.C.C. Minister, spiritual counselor, and end-of-life coach who honors the body-mind-spirit holistic approach. She currently works primarily with the Japanese who visit Sed...

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