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Katie Ross's picture

Money lessons every college grad should know

Katie Ross
Community Education and Marketing Manager
Keith Klein's picture

How to have a life after college and repay your student loans

Keith Klein, CFP®, ChFC®, CLU®, CASL®
Registered Financial Advisor
Frances A. Smith's picture

Consolidating your student loans is the best option to repay them

Frances A. Smith
Partner, Business Reorganization and Creditors Rights
Kevin Worthley's picture

Avoiding the horror stories of student loan debt

Kevin R. Worthley, CFP®, CDFA™
Vice-President, Certified Financial Planner™
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Education Loans

A lot of students tend to get in over their heads when it comes to getting student loans to pay for their education, whether undergraduate or graduate. It is OK to take out some, most everybody does it, but how much is too much? As you fill out your FAFSA, you should be aware of the interest rates of the loans you are taking out, as well as if they are unsubsidized or subsidized. If you are taking out a student loan from a bank, you should be aware of their repayment programs, payment programs, and how the loan will affect you throughout the lifetime of the loan, whether it be a 30 year term or lower. ExpertBeacon can help. Our experts in personal finance, accounting, credit, and loans are sure to give you the advice you need so that you aren’t caught unaware come graduation time.

Trouble paying your student loan payments? See if it can be forgiven

Similar to when you can’t pay back your student loans, there are a number of available options when you’re having trouble paying down your student loans. However, if, after exploring all your options, there is still no way you can afford your payments, it may be time to explore the possibility of student loan forgiveness.

Follow this advice to determine if you are eligible to have your student debt forgiven.

Scott SmithPresident

As president of CreditRepair.com, Scott Smith manages the credit repair delivery process for enrolled members, supervising a staff of dedicated consumer advocates and communications specialists. Scott has worked with CreditRepair.com since its i...

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Advice for recent college grads on paying off your student loans

College students are graduating with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt on average. Paying back that debt is difficult for many recent graduates searching for a job that will pay all the bills each month. However, if you can't pay your minimum each month, your credit health is being damaged because of it. Even paying only the minimum each month can negatively impact your credit score and report.

John C. HeathDirecting Attorney

John Heath was born and raised in Salt Lake City, Utah. He received his BA from the University of Utah and his Juris Doctor from Ohio Northern University. Mr. Heath has worked as an attorney in both a private and public interest practices. He...

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How to have a life after college and repay your student loans

Getting started on your own post-college is a turning point in many students’ lives. Big decisions like choosing a career and where to live loom large. For those who have taken on debt, student loan repayment begins approximately 2 months after graduation (though lenders differ in this requirement), and repayment may add even more stress. There are some simple things that you should do to get yourself off on the right footing after college.

Keith Klein, CFP®, ChFC®, CLU®, CASL®Registered Financial Advisor

After more than 15 years as a financial service advisor, Keith Klein CFP®, ChFC®, CLU®, CASL® reached his own Turning Pointe and founded Turning Pointe Wealth Management. It had become clear that the best way for Keith to provide unbiased soluti...

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Consolidating your student loans is the best option to repay them

Frances A. Smith Partner, Business Reorganization and Creditors Rights Shackelford, Melton, McKinley & Norton, LLP

You have finished your education and now it is time to pay off your loans. You may be receiving student loan statements from several creditors for differing amounts and at varying interest rates. Consolidating your student loans into one larger loan may simplify your repayment, but it also may result in you paying more overall. Before consolidating, analyze the options available and determine if loan consolidation is right for you.

Frances A. SmithPartner, Business Reorganization and Creditors Rights

Frances Smith represents a variety of clients in U.S. Bankruptcy Courts located in Texas and throughout the country. Her extensive legal experience includes work for debtors, secured lenders, unsecured creditor committees, trustees and asset pur...

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Avoiding the horror stories of student loan debt

For most students, going to college has become a near-necessity in the transition from childhood to self sufficient adulthood and their career path. Unfortunately, standing squarely in the middle of the path, like a tall NJ concrete barrier, is the ever rising cost of college. By some measures, the cost of college has risen 5 to 6 percent annually over the past decade and the average cost of attendance has doubled from 2000 to 2011.

Kevin R. Worthley, CFP®, CDFA™Vice-President, Certified Financial Planner™

Kevin is a Certified Financial Planner™ practitioner and college planning specialist with Wealth Management Resources, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor, in North Smithfield, RI. He has been helping families of all income levels with college...

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What to do when you can't make your monthly student loan payments

The cost of higher education has skyrocketed, and despite the attention this phenomenon has received in the news and from politicians, little has been done so far to stem the costs of a college degree. In fact, tuition (adjusted for inflation) has tripled for public universities and doubled for private universities in recent decades.

Scott SmithPresident

As president of CreditRepair.com, Scott Smith manages the credit repair delivery process for enrolled members, supervising a staff of dedicated consumer advocates and communications specialists. Scott has worked with CreditRepair.com since its i...

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Money lessons every college grad should know

Katie Ross Community Education and Marketing Manager American Consumer Credit Counseling

Thousands of students graduate from college every year. According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, on average they will graduate with $26,500 in student loan debt. Student loans are the second biggest source of personal debt, trailing only home mortgages, with the entire population accumulating more than $1 trillion.

Katie RossCommunity Education and Marketing Manager

Katie Ross joined ACCC's management team in 2002 and is currently responsible for organizing and implementing high performance development initiatives designed to increase consumer financial awareness. With more than more than thirteen years of ...

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Advice for when you are not able to pay your student loan payments

The shock of student loan repayment is one that is being felt around the country as countless graduates can’t find work, but are still stuck with a student loan bill. The inability to repay student loans is common; you are not alone. Here are some action steps you can take right now to deal with the harsh realities of not being able to pay. These are hard times that you can make better and learn from, so you can avoid other common financial pitfalls in the future. 

Jason WhalingFinancial Educator

Jason Whaling is the founder and CEO of The Wealth Titans. A financial education company dedicated to the training and development of individuals to reach their financial goals. Jason left his professional career as an accountant working at a la...

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Parents: Caution when cosigning for child’s college student loan

You may feel inclined to help your child get a better rate on his or her student loans by co-signing a student loan (whether private or federal). But can that really help your child get lower interest rates on the loan? There are some things to understand before you cosign a loan. By doing so, you will understand the potential repercussions of co-signing for that loan before putting yourself in a financially compromising position.

Leslie H. Tayne, Esq.President

Headquartered in Melville, N.Y. and led by financial attorney Leslie H. Tayne, Esq., The Law Offices of Leslie H. Tayne P.C. is the only New York State practice whose sole concentration is debt resolution and bankruptcy alternatives. Since its e...

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