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Frank Healy's picture

Men: Learn to cope after the death of a spouse

Frank Healy
Licensed Professional Counselor, Highly Superior Autobiographical Memory
Mara Baginski's picture

Take care of yourself emotionally after a loved one dies

Mara Baginski, LCSW
Bereavement Counselor
Christina Rasmussen's picture

Live, love and laugh again after the loss of a loved one

Christina Rasmussen
CEO & Founder of Second Firsts, Inc.
Elizabeth Berrien's picture

Advice on helping a loved one through the first year of grieving

Elizabeth Berrien
Author of Creative Grieving: A Hip Chick’s Path from Loss to Hope Co-founder of The Respite: A Centre for Grief & Hope
Mark Pitstick's picture

Learn to accept and embrace the death of a loved one

Mark Pitstick, MA, DC
Author, speaker, frequent radio/TV guest, and holistic chiropractic physician
Elizabeth Berrien's picture

Advice for surviving the death of a spouse or partner at a young age

Elizabeth Berrien
Author of Creative Grieving: A Hip Chick’s Path from Loss to Hope Co-founder of The Respite: A Centre for Grief & Hope
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Death of a Spouse

The death of a spouse or partner is a life-altering event that brings incomprehensible sorrow, pain and grief. This is the person whom you shared deep intimacy and dreams, and also built your life around. Not only does the pain feel overwhelming, but you must cope with the loss of a best friend, co-parent and confidant.The passing of someone so central to your life is certain to leave a tremendous emotional, physical and mental void. Your grief may be so deep that you feel as if your hope for the future died with your spouse.While nothing and no one can lessen this loss, you can find the support you need as you work through the stages of grief. Our experts can help you manage your intense feelings of sorrow, isolation and loneliness, as well as navigate the practical issues related to finances, legalities, identity and living arrangements.

Men: Learn to cope after the death of a spouse

Frank Healy Licensed Professional Counselor, Highly Superior Autobiographical Memory Associates For Life Enhancement

Losing your spouse can be the most devastating and stressful experience you can have. Although it is never easy, there are ways you can cope that are healthy and some ways that are not so healthy.This article will give you helpful hints to get through the difficult time and cope.

Frank HealyLicensed Professional Counselor, Highly Superior Autobiographical Memory

Frank Healy is a Licensed Professional Counselor in the State of New Jersey. He counsels people with depression and anxiety. He has Highly Superior Autobiographical Memory. He remembers every day of his life since he was six years old. This incl...

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Live, love and laugh again after the loss of a loved one

Everyone around you is probably telling you that after your loss you will always be hurt and grieving. There was no more explaining after those ideas were uttered, no elaboration on how much grieving they were talking about. No matter how many memoirs you have now read by people who had gone through a tragedy and the emphasis they put on their loss…you’ll realize that the idea of them ‘living’ after it was never really addressed.

Christina RasmussenCEO & Founder of Second Firsts, Inc.

Christina Rasmussen is on a crusade to change the way we live after loss. As the founder of Second Firsts, an organization to help people create a pathway back to life after loss, Christina spends her time speaking, coaching, and helping thousan...

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Advice on helping a loved one through the first year of grieving

Elizabeth Berrien Author of Creative Grieving: A Hip Chick’s Path from Loss to Hope Co-founder of The Respite: A Centre for Grief & Hope Elizabeth Berrien

Helping a loved one through a difficult loss can be challenging, confusing and painful. Your heart aches for your friend or family member, and you may feel helpless that you don’t have the power to change the situation for them. This can lead to frustration--and even exhaustion-- if you are your loved one’s main support system. While you may feel responsible for making things better, this type of pressure can end up creating larger issues for both you and your grieving loved one.

Elizabeth BerrienAuthor of Creative Grieving: A Hip Chick’s Path from Loss to Hope Co-founder of The Respite: A Centre for Grief & Hope

Elizabeth Berrien is the co-founder of the non-profit The Respite: A Centre for Grief & Hope (www.TheRespite.org) and also the founder of the organization Soul Widows (www.SoulWidows.org) for widows age 60 and under. Her journey began in 2008 w...

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Advice for surviving the death of a spouse or partner at a young age

Elizabeth Berrien Author of Creative Grieving: A Hip Chick’s Path from Loss to Hope Co-founder of The Respite: A Centre for Grief & Hope Elizabeth Berrien

Becoming a young widow is an experience that completely turns your life upside down. Everything that once made sense, no longer does. The pain feels unbearable, and you are suddenly thrust into unfamiliar territory.

Elizabeth BerrienAuthor of Creative Grieving: A Hip Chick’s Path from Loss to Hope Co-founder of The Respite: A Centre for Grief & Hope

Elizabeth Berrien is the co-founder of the non-profit The Respite: A Centre for Grief & Hope (www.TheRespite.org) and also the founder of the organization Soul Widows (www.SoulWidows.org) for widows age 60 and under. Her journey began in 2008 w...

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Take care of yourself emotionally after a loved one dies

After the death of a loved one our minds are usually full of mixed emotions and thoughts. Because our minds are on “overload” so to speak, we often forget about our own needs. It is important to understand that grief manifests in various ways. Once you understand how to identify grief and normal grief reactions, then can you learn to cope with the emotions and feelings associated with loss. People grieve differently because, quite simply, people are different. Grieving styles may also vary among the same person but for a different loss.

Mara Baginski, LCSWBereavement Counselor

Mara Krotec Baginski conducts individual and group bereavement support sessions for children and adults whose loved ones were under Family Hospice care. Ms. Baginski also facilitates anticipatory grief support to children and families. She is ac...

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The death of a spouse: Rebuilding your life after the first year

The first year after a spouse dies is extremely difficult. It is a year filled with firsts - the first Christmas, birthday and anniversary - alone. Facing these events on your own can be quite overwhelming. However, although fraught with difficulties, grieving in the first year is cushioned by caring family and friends, as well as numerous support groups.

Phyllis S. Zilkha, Ph.D.Psychologist

Ph.D. in psychology from New York University, MA from Columbia University. Head psychologist in a major corporation. Private psychotherapy practice for 20 years. Member of the New York State Psychological Association and the American Psychologic...

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Learn to accept and embrace the death of a loved one

Mark Pitstick, MA, DC Author, speaker, frequent radio/TV guest, and holistic chiropractic physician Radiant Wellness Center LLC

Death is part of life . . . not the most fun part, but an integral part. With the information in this article, you can learn how to optimally grieve and even celebrate the passing of a loved one.

In western cultures, religions generally have not done a good job of preparing people for death. God is often depicted as a giant dictator who decides whom dies when and how. That creates a quagmire of unanswerable questions such as, “Why did God take my loved one?” or “Why did God let my husband suffer so much before he died?” Fortunately, God is not a big guy in the sky.

Mark Pitstick, MA, DCAuthor, speaker, frequent radio/TV guest, and holistic chiropractic physician

Mark Pitstick, B.S., M.A., D.C., has over forty years experience and training in hospitals, pastoral counseling settings, mental health centers, and holistic private practice. His training includes a premedical degree, graduate theology/pastoral...

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